Tag Archives: .NET

39 – marc hoffman on Prism and Mac

Talking with marc hoffman of RemObjects talks with us about what is new in the Oxygene compiler in Delphi Prism and what to expect when developing applications on the Mac.

I remixed the audio to remove the 5 minute gap.

ShineOn 1.0.1.0 Released

Per Carlo Kok, ShineOn 1.0.1.0 is released today.  ShineOn is a library for Delphi Prism to assist in porting Delphi/Win32 and Delphi for .NET projects to Delphi Prism by providing a subset of RTL and core VCL classes that can be used instead of replacing all RTL/VCL calls with native FCL alternatives.

This is the first actual release.  Previously you had to download it from SVN.  It still appears to be a little lite on the documentation though, but it is exciting to see this project progressing forward.

Cirrus Aspect Oriented Programming Replay

My CodeRage 4 session on Aspect Oriented Programming with Delphi Prism is available for replay (full resolution).  Some of the links are there, but there will be more links and more downloads to come.  I also formatted the video (reduced resolution) to play on the iPod Touch, iPhone or any of a number of other compatible devices.

CodeRage is going on all week and I still have 2 more sessions to come.

Delphi Prism / Oxygene Questions

Monday’s podcast will feature an interview with RemObject‘s marc hoffmanDelphi Prism has been released, and it is powered by the RemObjects Oxygene compiler.   If you have any questions about the Oxygene Compiler then this is your opportunity to ask them of marc, as he is the Chief Software Architect for RemObjects.

Please, leave your questions in the box below, and I will cover what I can with marc.  Remember, keep your questions focused on Oxygene and RemObjects as marc won’t be able to answer questions on behalf of CodeGear or Embarcadero.

15 – Julian Bucknall on DevExpress

I got a chance to sit down with Julian Bucknall, the CTO of DevExpress at PDC2008 to talk about using DevExpress’ .NET products with CodeGear‘s Delphi Prism from Embarcadero Technology.

Specifically we talk about the return of CodeRush to Delphi.

The microphone picked up all the background noise, which makes it a little hard to understand us, so I added captions.

Watch online:

 

File Downloads:

[Transcript 90% done]

Anders Hejlsberg on Programming Languages

Anders Hejlsberg at Microsoft Development Center Copenhagen (MDCC) talking about Where are Programming Languages Going? He comes in at about 3:07 and opens with a demo of Turbo Pascal to celebrate it’s 25th anniversary this month.

I love the stats he opens with about where programming languages were when Turbo Pascal came out 25 years ago. A great talk!

Covers DSL, Functional Programming, LINQ, etc.

[Source] [Hat tip Olaf Monien via Twitter]

5 – Oxygene and .NET

Back in episode 2 Nick Hodges told us to learn the latest features of .NET since the future version of Delphi for .NET will have full support of all .NET features.  Instead of learning C# or VB.NET, we can use Oxygene by RemObjects.  In this episode we talk with marc hoffman of RemObjects about Oxygene – the surprisingly complete Object Pascal implementation for .NET.

Also a note about last week’s episode: In addition to all the great information on using generic collections, I also had asked our guest, Julian Bucknall, some questions about the implementation of the TDictionary class.  Julian did not write this class, nor did he heavely research the code.  He did  tell me how he understood it worked.  Well it turns out he a missunderstood some of the implementation details.  Barry Kelly, the author of that class added some comments on the show notes for that show.  Check those comments out for a correction on the implementation of the generic TDictionary in Delphi 2009.

Delphi Win32 and .NET Diverging

I was really expecting someone to pick this up from the podcast and mention it.  If you listen at about 15:56 in the podcast, we hear Nick say the following about the .NET Roadmap.

Historically one of our strong .NET stories has been close compatibility with the .NET and Win32 compilers.  But as we have evaluated that we have found that doing that is kind of holding both compilers back to a certain degree.  And that compatibility story not as compelling as it necessarily was.  And so what we are looking at instead is a solution that departs or sort of begins to diverge away from that compatibility story.  And starts heading more towards complete support for the .NET framework kind of thing.  And so you’ll be seeing more information about that in the coming weeks.

Does this strike anyone else as huge news, or are you all just more patient then I am in waiting for the .NET roadmap?

What do you all think?